It is all a matter of interpretation!

Yarner Wood has a long history of colourful interpretation, dating back to the times a permit was required to visit the woodland. From these early signs, a leaflet was then created – the first editions of which were black and white. Our leaflets and brochures have come a long way since then! You can find our current literature in each of the bird hides and in the office at Yarner Wood. Alongside the first examples of signage and leaflets wasRead more

Did You Know Dormice Snore?

Did you know Hazel Dormice snore? No, I didn’t either until last week when I looked down on an amber ball of fur, pink feet neatly curled, eyes firmly shut and black tail end gripped like a miniature feather duster. The noise was the exact sort of high-pitched sigh you’d imagine from these little snoozers. I put my hand over my mouth to stifle a snort of glee. I needn’t have bothered as there was no waking him. The licensedRead more

Nice Day for a Bio-blitz

1952 was a landmark year for Yarner Wood and, as a fine example of an upland western oak wood it became England’s first ever National Nature Reserve. Over time, the area protected for Dartmoor’s wildlife has expanded and now the East Dartmoor National Nature Reserve also includes the heaths, bogs and streams of Trendlebere Down that connect with ribbons of mixed woodland flowing along the Bovey Valley. After a significant 7 decades of protecting the habitats and species of EastRead more

Helping Hands to Help Heathland

Students from Exeter College’s Supported Internship Programme spent two days this autumn working with Natural England to protect an important heathland area at East Dartmoor Woods and Heaths National Nature Reserve. They gained new skills, while helping to conserve the environment – this blog describes their time at the Reserve. We learnt about the importance of protecting heathland areas because it provides habitat for a variety of species such as the Nightjar. This rare bird travels from Africa in AprilRead more

The Ash Bud Moth and Woodland Connectivity

Fragmentation of habitat plays a major role in the decline of species and, as ecological research seeks for more evidence of the changing conditions across a wider landscape, increasing problems from the spread of tree diseases are adding to these threats to survival. In some cases, there is an obvious, visible isolation of trees and woodlands but we must also consider the less apparent isolation of some of the small but vital species that rely on those trees. Some wildRead more

Wood Ants – the world beneath your feet

The distinctive thatched domes of wood ant nests are a ubiquitous part of the National Nature Reserve (NNR) landscape, frequently ignored or the cause of mild distress if you unknowingly stand within a foraging route on a woodland track. They may be one of life’s ‘you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone’ as despite being locally common across England and Wales there are real concerns about contraction of red wood ant populations. So a timely look at theRead more